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Author: Leah Wardle SPTF

“Refugee microfinance” is too risky, right? After all, refugees are more likely to default on their loan because they don’t have ties to the local community or profit-generating enterprises. They are likely to rejected by existing clients as “competition” or simply as outsiders. Refugees’ lack of collateral and their unstable legal status give them little incentive to develop a long-term relationship with the financial service provider (FSP). Right?

Not necessarily. In fact, quite the opposite has been true for Al Majmoua, a Lebanese microfinance institution (MFI) serving Syrian, Pilipino, and Palestinian migrants and refugees (in addition to low-income Lebanese clients).

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Author: Daniel Rozas

This blog is a republication of a post from the MimosaIndex.org website. 

Since publishing the first MIMOSA report – on Cambodia – I’ve heard one persistent critique.  We say that the market is saturated, yet none of the current indicators appear to support it: repayments are great, there’s no field evidence of widespread overindebtedness, and the major MFIs are all undergoing a process of Smart Certification. How can we assert that Cambodia is at risk of overindebtedness, let alone a credit crisis, when no other indicators seem to support it?

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Author: Philippe Breul

Around 630.000 refugees running away from their conflict-affected countries, mainly Syria, are holding up in Jordan. The Jordanian government has to deal with the new economic outlook presented by this emergency situation through The Jordan Response Plan 2015. This plan is unfortunately underfunded by the emergency international agencies and should be complemented by a system which could guarantee the quality and security of the services provided. One of the main issues to be addressed remains the access of these refugees to financial services.

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Author: e-MFP

Since it was published a few weeks ago, the 2014 Global Findex financial inclusion report has made a splash in media around the world. The headlines may have differed, but the articles all mention the key finding from the press release published by the World Bank: Massive Drop in Number of Unbanked. According to the Findex survey, which covered more than 150,000 people in 143 economies, the number of people with financial access grew from 51 percent to 62 percent between 2011 and 2014, a shift that reportedly represents a total of 700 million people worldwide

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Author: Arvind Ashta - Saleh Khan - Philipp Otto

Our paper on suicides and microfinance, researched in 2011, was recently published in Strategic Change (Ashta, Khan, & Otto, 2015). It is worthwhile to establish clearly what we found, what we learned, and distinguish this from what we didn't find, and to reiterate clearly our policy recommendations for MFIs and regulators.

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Author: Daniel Rozas

The press release from the World Bank did not hold back: “Massive Drop in Number of Unbanked,” reads the headline. In just three years, the number of adults with a bank account has grown from 51% to 62% -- an increase of 700 million people. That’s a fantastic number!

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Author: e-MFP

This week, e-MFP announced the launch of the 6th European Microfinance Award. This year, the Award will recognise one of most important challenges that some financial institutions face: providing financial services to vulnerable clients in post-conflict or post-crisis regions. As all e-MFP members well know, providing quality services to clients in stable markets poses many challenges – from managing portfolio risk, to expanding product offerings, hedging risk, understanding clients, adapting to regulatory changes, sourcing funds and innovating with new technologies.

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Author: Daniel Rozas

The microfinance sector has many actors with many different objectives, but if there is one common element that all agree on, it’s that microfinance should not harm the clients. And one of the most important elements of client protection are responsible collections practices.

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Author: Daniel Rozas

The microfinance sector has been abuzz with the implications of the “final word” study on microcredit impact. For many, including myself, this has been an opportunity to consider a trend that’s been taking place for several years now – from microfinance to financial inclusion. In my last blog, I touched upon the subject of metrics that this new shift requires. I would like to delve deeper.

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